Sew Small Contest- Part 2

Back to the last of my Sew Small Contest entry.

First up is the top from Simplicity 1086.  I originally planned not to use any patterns I had previously used.  But after I got the grey wool flannel picked for the coat and the burgundy cotton for the skirt; this grey and blue floral quilting cotton just seemed to say it wanted to be the top for the outfit.  I decided the top had to be simple because I really wanted the coat to be the feature item of the outfit.  So a simple blouse was the perfect complement for the outfit; Simplicity 1086 top from view F fit perfect.

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Since I had made this before in August, I knew that there didn’t need to be any pattern alterations.

I used this contest to sew one of the Liberty Jane coat patterns I have, the Piccadilly pea coat from the Euro Libby line.  If I could, I would probably wear this coat also as I adore the pleated detail in the back.

I didn’t do any pattern alterations.  I used a grey wool flannel for the outside and a silk crepe for the lining.  I will admit, the silk may not have been the best choice for lining.  It was very temperamental to cut.  It was picked mainly because I had it at home and needed to use it up.

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The only part of the instructions I didn’t care for was the attaching the back facing to the back lining.  They have you stay stitch then iron that under so that you create a lap seam.  I did this but didn’t like the results I got.  There is just too much of a curve on the seam to be able to make a nice lap seam like that.  Instead I recut my back neck facing and put the two pieces together and stitched.  Then I clipped my curve and pressed it.  Finally I top-stitched the seam.  I think it came out more consistent.

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My sewing machine didn’t care much for where the buttons were located. So I moved them in from the edge some and moved the buttons toward the edge some to make up for the difference. The quarter-inch buttons are just too small for my machine.  For Molly’s suit https://sewbeading.wordpress.com/2014/09/09/molly-waves-goodbye-lee-pearl-1943/, I used 3/8th inch buttons and didn’t have any problems with my machine making the buttonholes.

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While on the topic of buttons, I thought the quarter-inch buttons were very hard for me to button.  I honestly think a child would get very frustrated at trying to button up the coat.  I understand that the quarter-inch buttons were picked because of scale.  The main buttons won’t look too large or the sleeve buttons too small.  However, in future makes, I will be using 3/8th inch buttons for the main coat buttons.

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One thing I wish was clearer in the pattern pieces would have been to have a separate button/ buttonhole template piece.  In fact before I make this again, I will go ahead and make me a separate template for that.  As I was getting towards the end of the project, I did not pull the instructions up on my computer. I went ahead and pulled out the front pattern piece and marked the button and buttonhole placement. My pattern piece had x’s and blocks marking the buttons and buttonholes. I didn’t realize the mark are combined for the two different sides.  So a separate pattern piece with just one mark style on it would helped me realize that just buttons or just buttonholes are on that side.  I do not own a double-breasted front button coat; if I did I may have avoided my big mistake. I put three buttons and three buttonholes on each side.

This coat took a lot of time.  I probably spent about 24 hours working on this doll coat.  There is a little bit of everything in this coat such as hand sewing the lining, buttons, buttonholes, and top stitching.  What makes this coat special is all the detail work that goes into it.  This isn’t a coat to pick out of the pile for a simple fast easy project.

Just for a simple ready to wear doll clothing comparison,  a double-breasted trench coat is $28 at the American Girl store.  All in total for supplies, I spent about $10.75.

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