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Kirsten’s Prairie Ensemble- Keeper Dolly Duds 3

It was Kirsten’s turn for a new outfit.  I have had this Keeper Dolly Duds’ “Prairie Ruffle” for a little while and went with that for her.

Both the dress and the apron are from quilting cotton.

Prairie Ruffle was listed as easy.  I think that is appropriate for the dress.  I really only looked at the directions for the collar of the dress and for the ruffle on the sleeve.  But the apron while it wasn’t hard was definitely tricky when trying to imagine how the pieces go together.  I used the instructions for the entire apron.  I didn’t quite understand how the bottom corners at the hem were constructed either.

It isn’t something I usually do with doll clothes, but I would definitely recommend stay stitching the neck line for the apron.  It is such a wide open neckline that the stay stitching should help it from stretching out until you finish it with the ruffle and bias binding.

As always, I didn’t want to make the buttonholes so the back closes with hook and loop fastener.  I probably need to add another row of hook and loop fastener on the apron as the back is loose.

This is another personal preference but I didn’t want as long of a button placket down the apron.  I kept all the buttons up on the bodice of the apron so I didn’t mess with the gathering of the apron skirt.

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Learning From History Up date

The posts for “Learning From History” sort of got side-lined when life just got too busy to type up a post and learn.

The closet did get sorted and organized.  Everything seems to be working well.  I just need to get a couple more containers for items.

For moth control, there is a combination of lavender and cedar.  In fact, my dad noticed some of his wool dress pants had holes in them (probably from moths) so they joined in with my “moth control” kick.  As of now, there is grated lavender soap (a suggestion I found on the Olive + S blog), a solid lavender air freshener, cedar blocks and an open box of bounce.  I haven’t noticed any problems with my closet.

As for mending, the darning mushroom won out over the darning egg.  I am still not the best but I at least am putting forth effort to try.

As to mending, Closet Case Patterns has a couple of blog post on mending.

Invisible Mending on Sewing Machine

Visible Mending (Sashiko)

Doll Clothing Week- Virginia Maizenaski for McCall’s

 Here is the doll designer interview from the lead doll designer for McCall’s Virginia Maizenaski.
Questions:
1. What was your first doll?
My first doll was an 11 1/2” Samantha doll from the TV show Bewitched.
2. What was the last doll you got?
The last doll I got was a self-made cloth doll that was a storybook doll.
3. What is one sewing notion you absolutely must have?
When creating dolls and crafts, I must have my extra long doll needle. My second must have is my stuffing tool.
4. What pattern from your line would you recommend to someone who hasn’t tried  your patterns before?
I would recommend M7106 – a Learn to Sew doll clothes pack for 18” doll.
5. Where did you get the  inspiration for the new pattern?
The pack is based on popular children’s fashion.
On your website, it looks like most of the doll patterns are either 18″(like American girl brand style) or 11 1/2 inch like Barbie except for a couple of baby doll style.  Is McCall’s and Butterick considering expanding the doll clothing sizes available to include 13/14 inch dolls like the Hearts for Hearts or Wellie Wishers?
We are considering putting out packs for this size doll.
Thank you to Virginia and McCall’s for answering the questions that I gave her.

Learning from History Part 2- Special Care Items

Getting ready for the new windows and siding interfered with working more on this series.  Then the sewing machine was gone for 3 weeks so I haven’t been able to apply the one item I wanted to try out on the new dress pants I had got for a conference yet.

The next section in the book is Special Care garments.  This section is a mix bag of being too out-of date for modern times and some really good tips.  Some of the special care garments I just don’t have like a corset, rubber apron or ties.  As much as I think hats are pretty, I have to admit that I just don’t have the lifestyle that requires a hat so those tips are not as useful.

There is a big section on leather shoes and boots.  I don’t own a leather shoes.  Most of what I have are most likely vinyl based man- made materials.  However, I did find it interesting that the book suggested soaking your feet in cold water after removing your shoes for the day to prevent perspiration the next day.

Other tips in the towel section are outdated like take your towel with you to the hairdresser.  I think the health policies would prevent you from being able to do this.

Towel section also recommends hanging towels outside, which I can’t do because of allergies.  I really don’t want to be sneezing every time I pick up a towel.

Some of the tips I actually already do! For knitted wool garments, it states to never hang them.  I already fold my sweaters and place them on a shelf in my closet (now in a plastic tub since I reorganized my closet).

The one tip that I will definitely be doing is the sewing a piece of material on the inside of trousers/ pants to prevent the fabric from wearing thin from rubbing against your shoes.

Up next in the series is learning to mend.  I was able to find a darning mushroom and a darning egg at Fabric Recycle recently.

 

Learning from History- Part 1 Followup

Here is the follow-up on what I learned last time.

As for closet organization, I took some measurement of the shelves that are in my closet.  After looking around, I dragged my dad to IKEA (we were probably the only two there that don’t care much for IKEA).  There I was able to pick up six larger plastic boxes and three smaller plastic boxes with lids.  I didn’t remember my closet correctly and am short two big tubs and one small tub.  I thought I had 3 shelves not 4.

Just something to note, the lids never really clicked or snapped into place.  It seems more of a topper instead of an air-tight lid.

Next up on the list to tackle was moth prevention.  Everything on the internet stressed the health risk of using mothballs and that it is a danger to pets.  I decided to use a combo of cedar and lavender.  As for cedar, I went to the laundry care aisle and bought so many cedar disk.  For the lavender, I decided to try using reed diffusers since I do have a fairly large- sized closet.  However, it seems like reed diffuser are going out of style because I couldn’t find any reasonable priced.  I decided to try to make my own.  As of right now, I have bamboo skewers for the reeds in a small bottle filled with diffuser oil from Walmart.  I am not sure if it was meant for reed type diffuser or a warming pot sort of diffuser.  Plus I also am trying out a solid air freshener in lavender too.  As of now, with an allergy induced troubles, the solid air freshener seems stronger.

I have seen that you can make your own reed diffuser oil on the internet and will try that out too.

One interesting item to note is the moths that eat clothing don’t like light.  So I may consider the option of a touch light later in my closet but I need to get things clean up and organized how I want it before considering lights or not.

So far, the closet is only about half way cleaned.  I still need to work on finishing it up but it will probably be put on hold until after the siding/ windows  are done.  The siding company called yesterday saying they are ready for installing and would start today (like two days before a snowstorm).  Fortunately, my dad told them no way, that they need to wait until beginning of April.  So I have a little bit of time to move stuff away from windows and doors (and get the bunny packed up for an extended visit to grandma).

 

 

 

Spanish Fan (#S-897)

dsci0144After making some doilies for my mom’s Christmas, I decided to start one for my craft/ guest room to put on the pattern file cabinet (but then was sidetracked with the crochet animals for a month).

I originally started off with another pattern from the Coronet from Coat’s & Clark’s #197 (same book as my grey Brocade doily).  I only got to row seven then was stuck.  The row really didn’t look like the picture at all.

So abandoning the Coronet, I searched through the other crochet patterns I had and settled on the Spanish Fan (#S-897) from Coat’s & Clark’s #324 Priscilla Doilies to Crochet (circa 1956).  The main deciding factor was that the caption above the picture stated “The elegance of simplicity… a charming design that is easy to crochet, even for beginners”.  It didn’t hurt that there were also, 5 other doilies listed in Ravelry.  At least I knew others had made it.

I used Aunt Lydia’s Classic crochet thread size 10 in coral instead of the size 30 thread requested in the pattern.  I also used a B sized crochet hook (2.25mm).  In the end, my doily was about 21 inches wide.

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This is one time I may have to agree with the pattern book.  This was a fairly easy doily to crochet.  I had the first 5 rounds completed before Christmas.  So when I recently re-picked up this project I did have a little trouble trying to figure out where I left off at. But after that was sorted out, I was able to follow the pattern very easy.  I didn’t complete round 34.  I did start the round which has picots in the chain between the double crochet stitches.  My picots looked so messy that I decided it was best to finish it at round 33.

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Upcoming crochet projects include a doily for my mother for Mother’s day and making Emma the bunny from “Edward’s Menagerie”.