Tag Archive | doll clothing

LJC UK Holiday Outfit for Hearts For Hearts Girls

Another Hearts for Hearts Girls outfit.  This time I made Dell the Liberty Jane UK Holiday outfit.  Lately, I have been using my 1/4″ guide quilting foot for my Pfaff Ambition.  It has been really great and easy to use.

Liberty Jane suggest that the skill level for the UK Holiday outfit is intermediate.  The intermediate rating is more in likely because of the knit fabric choice.  Otherwise the pattern was very easy to assemble.

For Dell’s top, I used a rayon lycra jersey knit.  It is especially important that the knit for the top be very light and drapey.  If it isn’t, then the top will not look great and be pretty bulky looking on your doll.  To make the waist elastic casing and the casing at the bottom of the sleeves, I used my beige colored Hug Snug binding.  I used 1/4 inch elastic for the entire top.

Even though the top was a fairly easy sew, I am not sure I like it enough to use the top pattern again.  I think this is more personal preference than pattern issues.

However, I do like the legging pattern and will be using that more in the future.  Dell is currently wearing the leggings using a stretch knit denim looking fabric.  I used the 1/4 inch elastic for the waist of the leggings.  If I am remembering correctly, I think the leggings took under an hour to make.

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Rahel’s Ethiopian Dress

June 10 is World Doll Day.  So lets celebrate by showing off Rahel in her new dress.  Rahel is the third Hearts for Hearts doll added to my collection.

Rahel got the Ethiopian dress from Wren Feathers designs.  Honestly, it is an extremely easy pattern to put together.  I read through the directions and I decided that I was going to use a Velcro to close the back of the dress up.  I printed out a separate piece for the back and then added 3/8th of an inch to the center back for the Velcro.

The stash really didn’t have all the colorful trim that the pattern asked for.  Instead, I used my machine’s decorative stitches and the straight stitch for trim.  It was stitch 32 or 36 on my Pfaff Ambition Essential.  I really wished I would have went with more colorful stitches instead of staying with the single color which matched Rahel’s bangles and necklace.  As for the main fabric, I have to admit it is a mystery fabric that I got from Hancock’s remnant bin.  But it was a lovely light blue which worked well with the trim stitching.

However, I didn’t catch that the sleeve area should have had the binding also.

Let’s Welcome Nahji

I finally caved in and bought the Hearts For Hearts Nahji doll.  Nahji is so much prettier in person than the stock photos on Pixie Faire show.  Just in case you haven’t heard about Hearts for Hearts girls, please definitely check out their website.  Their dolls are from different areas all over the world and a portion of the purchase goes to charity.  As of right now, there are 4 dolls available: Dell (Kentucky), Rahel (Ethiopia), Consuelo (Mexico), and Nahji.  Nahji is from Assam, India.  This summer, Hearts for Hearts are planning on releasing another 2 dolls.

Nahji needed an outfit like the other dolls for Me-Made May too.  I probably should have used one of the free patterns I got when I purchased my doll off of Pixie Faire’s website.  But instead I decided upon using Liberty Jane’s Baseball Tee and the Genoa Jumper.

I really liked the American Girl dolls’ version of the Baseball tee so I figured it would be best to start Nahji’s outfit with a pattern I know I like.  I had originally planned a coral tee with a brown jumper.  But I couldn’t find the brown fabric.  Instead Nahji gets a rose tee with a teal jumper.  The rose fabric is some of the scraps of rayon Lycra that I had left over from the Jalie raglan tees I made in February but haven’t really taken photos of yet.  This is the Hearts for Hearts specific baseball tee, and it fits Nahji well.  The pieces went together so easily.

I must have been really distracted by Lala while I was cutting out the Genoa pattern.  The lining and fashion fabric didn’t line up at the hem.  So instead of following the instructions, I did simplify it and close the side seams with the serger and lined up the bottom.  I just surged and turned under the hem so that I made sure I was able to catch the lining in the hem.

My sewing machine hates quarter- inch buttons with a passion.  Instead, I used Velcro for the closure.  I will have to say that buttons do make the outfit.  Even with the print my dress is just missing that detail that a button would provide.

The Genoa pattern is advertised as fitting both 14 inch dolls (like Hearts for Hearts) and 14.5 inch dolls (like the Wellie Wishers).  For Nahji, it does seem a little loose but it isn’t drowning my doll.

As this is being typed up, I have been anxiously awaiting to hear when Rahel and Consuelo to come (granted I can’t get them until the weekend because I shipped them to my parents’ house).

 

Samantha’s floral dress Simplicity 1179

Samantha was the last doll to get a new dress for Me- Made- May.  Now all my dolls are wearing hand-made for the month.

Samantha got view D from Simplicity 1179 designed by Keepers Dolly Duds for Simplicity.  Her dress made from a quilting cotton.  Like previous doll makes, I switched out the button closure for Velcro.  I really should have tried the dress on my doll before finishing it.  It is a touch looser than expected because I really didn’t consider where her back seam should be for switching the closure out to Velcro.

I like this view much better than the view B that I made for Rebecca back in February.  I recommend being slow and cautious when doing the pin-tucks on the sleeve.  As far as I could tell, there was really not a great method of marking them.  I marked it on the back like usual, but the pin-tuck covers the marking as one is sewing.

I really didn’t have a great match for lace on the front bodice so I left that off of Samantha’s dress.  However, if Samantha gets a light lavender pinafore that should complete her outfit off quite nicely.

With the weather picking up and hopefully no rain, I should be able to get pictures of the back log of projects.

Melody’s Sunday Outfit- Butterick 6265

Melody got her first hand-made outfit!  Melody got a lined jacket and a dress from Butterick 6265.  It is a reprint from 1957.  I did a quick internet check to see if the style was still around in 1964 girls sewing patterns.  I was able to find some examples so I went ahead with my plan.

I have half a yard of this lime green daisy print quilting cotton that would work well for the skirt.  The pattern shows the jacket and the skirt matching, however, my print was just too big for the jacket to look as nice.  So for the jacket, I decided on a coordinating solid (probably a little more of a contemporary look since it isn’t matching).

Lets start first with the lined dress.  I think the main reason the bodice is lined is for a clean finish at the neck line.  The instructions have you sew the neckline and end of sleeves of the lining and outer fabric together.  Side seams I finished off with my serger.  Skirt and petticoat are sewn on after the side seams are finished.

I did cheat on the netting petticoat.  I bought one of the 6 inch wide rolls of tulle and just used that.  I didn’t follow the pattern piece but just took a length off the roll and baste stitched it.  Then I matched it up to the skirt piece; gathering as needed.  The skirt was basted and gathered to fit the bodice.  To be honest, with the amount of gathers in the skirt, one probably doesn’t need the netting petticoat that is included in the pattern if you use a quilting cotton.

 

On to the jacket, the lined jacket was actually easier than I anticipated and I had it completed before dinner the day I cut it out.  It is just 2 pattern pieces the jacket front and jacket back.  In the end, I decided to construct all the outer blue fabric together as one time.  Then after a break, I cut out the lining and put it together.  The lining and outer fashion fabric are sewn together on the outside edge, then slipped through the opening you leave at the bottom.  That opening is hand sewn closed.  So after a good press, it was on to attaching the sleeve lining to the outer fabric.  It was not able to be machine sewn so it was hand sewn also.  Lastly, I decided to just sew in a snap so the jacket can close but still have the simple front.

To be honest, I think this jacket would look so cute with jeans and a t-shirt also.

Molly’s Floral Dress- K&R Vintage Patterns (S3234)

I was able to sneak another doll outfit in between items for my dad. This time it was Molly’s turn for a new dress.  For Molly’s new dress, I decided to try out a new pattern designer, K&R Vintage patterns.  The patterns are scaled down children’s sewing patterns.  It was nice to be able to say you made a real 1940’s dress for your doll. The one I chose was Simplicity 3234 (rough estimate of 1940-ish).

This was another time that my fabric stash let me down. I just couldn’t find anything in it that fit my vision of what Molly’s dress should look like.  So it was another trip to the fabric store.  There I came across this lovely aqua floral quilting cotton that ended up being perfect.  I decided against trim for the collar of the dress and opted for letting the print be the main focal point.  I figured the dress could be trim-less because Molly didn’t have enough rationing coupons for lace.

I only made the dress, but I did notice that the cutting layout has you include an item for the pinafore (Pinafore Belt N) on the dress layout. If you are just making the dress, it isn’t needed.  If you are making the pinafore, you probably should decide whether you want it out of the pinafore fabric or the dress fabric.

I didn’t do any pattern alternations even though I know Molly is on the larger size of dolls. However, I knew that I was not going to keep the button back closure.  I inserted the collar.  For the lining I only stitched the neckline seams (I didn’t continue it down the sides).  Then the bodice and lining were ironed flat.  Sleeves were stitched to both outer fabric and lining then ran through the serger for seam finishing.  I really didn’t want to hand sew the lining to the sleeve.  Bottom of bodice (and lining) were basted for gathering into the “belt” waistband pieces.  The bodice was attached to the waistband.  Skirt was attached to waistband.  Then I measured to find where the center back was on the pattern piece.  It was half-inch from raw edge.  My Velcro is quarter-inch wide, so I subtracted that out from the half-inch and used a three-eighth seam allowance for the back.

Overall, the pattern was fairly easy to put together.  Since, it is a scale down of the 1940s children’s sewing pattern, the instruction may confuse a new seamstress.  In the center is the original pattern instructions.  The instructions along the sides is how you put together your doll dress.  I did print out the instructions just because I was not certain about the instructions layout.  But otherwise, it was easy to follow.

Slowly working through my dolls, next up will be Melody.  I have a Butterick pattern picked out and some fabric.  I just need to decide what fabric to use for the jacket.

 

 

Felicity’s Jacket- Thimbles & Acorns 18th Century Hooded Jacket

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After Rebecca, Felicity was up next for a new outfit.  I had seen Jessa’s version of Thimbles and Acorns’ 18th Century Hooded jacket so that plus that the pattern is rated as easy seem to seal the deal as that is what Felicity was going to get for the new outfit.

My friend Annette had given me some lovely scraps of fabric at one of our Christmas parties for KC Pinheads.  If I remember right, I think she said that the fabric I ended up using for Felicity’s skirt is an Italian wool?.  Anyways, the skirt was very simple to make.  It is gathered rectangles on a waistband.  Now, I determined I don’t care for the instructions of sewing ties into the waistband and then tying the skirt shut on both sides.  So I decided to use Velcro on one side only.  The other side’s waist band was sewn closed and the pocket opening sides were stitched down.  So the pocket opening is still usable (if Felicity had pockets).

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As for the jacket, I had planned on using the skirt fabric to make the hood.  But the more I thought about it; the more I came to realize that doing that would limit the versatility of having separate pieces.  In the end, I decided to use the blue cotton voile for the collar and outer fabric and the white quilting cotton for the lining.  Maybe if I scour my fabric stash some more, Felicity could have another skirt to coordinate with her blue jacket.

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Again, I changed the closure of the jacket from laced/ hooks to Velcro.  Since I made that change, I used a narrower seam allowance on the front of 3/8 inch instead so the fronts would overlap.

Lace was subbed in for the soutashe on the sleeves.

I had a little bit of trouble with the sleeves.  I was under the impression that the whole jacket was being turned through the bottom of the sleeve then hand sewing the bottom of sleeve closed.  So it would be making complete outer and complete lining then put them together.  But the instructions have you turning through the armhole at the shoulder area.  I had to remove my sleeve and redo them.  Then after everything was finished, the arm shoulder/ sleeve seam was hand sewn shut.

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In the photos, Felicity is wearing her original shift (chemise) from American Girl under the jacket and skirt.  To be honest, the jacket is a bit tight in the upper arm area because of it.  I almost wonder if I had finished my seams with the serger, I may have been able to skip the hand sewing and maybe get a little extra ease at the armhole.

Felicity was so fortunate that my friends at the New Lancaster General store let her have a photo shoot in their lunch area/ overflow tasting room when my parents and I visited before Valentine’s day.

One three more dolls are waiting for new hand-made outfits: Samantha, Molly, and Melody.  But for now, they will have to wait until a few other projects are completed first.